Its OK to Let Your Tech Resume Be 2 Pages. 1jpg

 

When it comes to creating a tech resume, one of the most hotly debated points is how long a resume should be. Most professionals have been conditioned to believe that a one-page document is ideal, if not the only option. However, as more resumes are submitted electronically, the old advice has become less relevant.

 

Before you submit your resume for consideration, understand that it is okay if you end up with a two-page document, but only if both pages provide the right amount of value. If you are trying to decide which length is right for you, here is what you need to know.

 

Focus on Quality

Every sentence, accomplishment, and bullet point on your resume should provide the hiring manager with value. By nature, a solid resume is a combination of thorough and concise, relaying critical information in the most streamlined way possible.

 

Usually, this means you shouldn’t add every detail about every position you’ve ever held. Instead, you need to identify which points are genuinely relevant and eliminate anything extraneous.

 

If, after you audit your resume, you end up with a two-page document filled with points that align with the vacancy announcement and showcase you as an ideal candidate, then you can submit it as is. However, if anything doesn’t speak to what is requested in the job ad, then remove it and, if you end up with a one-page resume, send it that way.

 

Consider White Space

Often, if you are actively having to cram your relevant skills, experiences, and accomplishments onto one-page by overly tweaking the margins, font size, or line spacing, you end up with a wall of text that’s hard to read, which is never ideal. A resume should be a comfortable combination of text and white space, so, if space is no longer on your side, then opting for a two-page resume is a better choice.

 

As you craft your resume, try to keep the margins set to one inch and the text around 12-point. If, by doing so, you genuinely need that second page, then let the information spill over.

 

The Length of Page Two

If you finish your tech resume and page two only have one to three lines on it, then you may be better off condensing to one-page. Otherwise, it may look like the spillover is accidental or that you lacked the ability to edit the document down properly.

 

However, if you’ve crossed into four lines or more, then resist the urge to fill the remaining space unless you have pertinent details to include. Usually, if you try to force it, all you end up with is a bunch of fluff that doesn’t provide value, and that isn’t a great approach if you want to keep the hiring manager’s attention.

 

Ultimately, having a two-page tech resume is okay as long as all of the points are relevant to the role and presented in a concise manner. If you would like to know more about resume building or are seeking out new employment opportunities, the team at The Armada Group can help. Contact us to speak with one of our knowledgeable recruiters today and see how our hiring expertise can benefit you.

 

 

Published in Recruiting

Resume

 

It wasn’t that long ago that the recommendation to use bullet points on your resume became commonplace. The approach was considered a strong alternative to giant blocks of text, a method that was often more difficult to read and generally unappealing. However, the use of bullet points shifted from helping provide a level of clarity in key sections to the go-to style for almost every portion of the resume.

 

The higher amount of use isn’t a fatal flaw in itself. However, the way bullet points are used can cause problems. To help you understand why you should bypass the bullet point approach in some cases, here is an overview of the trouble they can cause and how to produce a better resume.

Unintelligible Data Dumps

Bullet points began as an exercise in brevity, helping professionals keep things simple and clear. Over time, many began using them for every aspect of their resume. This leads to a series of factoids being listed about your experience without any depth.

 

Often, there is little if any context for these short statements and explanations are essentially nonexistent. Instead, candidates assume hiring managers will fill in the blanks themselves, even though that typically isn’t the case. These resumes don’t produce a clear picture as to why you are an ideal fit for the position and can lead to being passed over instead.

Creating Context

To make bullet points work for you, they need to be combined with greater context. First, make sure to include a summary section near the top of your resume. This highlights key points of interested customized to the position to which you are applying and serves as an introduction. Then, make sure to include explanations on a regular basis. This can include quick overviews of each position before adding bullet points as support or highlight key skill areas and how specific experiences support your knowledge.

 

The idea is to use a combination approach of short paragraphs supported by additional points. This ensures you create a whole picture of how your career unfolded and why the hiring manager should be interested in the bullet points that follow. It also makes your resume more interesting visually as it provides some variation in the structure. When used properly, you can even design the document to drawn the eye from one section to the next, leading them along through the story of your professional life.

Making Adjustments

A resume is a living document; it is always in a growth period and will almost never be completely perfect. As you apply to jobs and schedule interviews, use any feedback that is provided to create a stronger document. Ultimately, a resume is a first impression. You should take every opportunity to ensure it is the best one you can possibly make.

 

If you are interested in a new position in your field, The Armada Group can help you find new options in your area. Contact us to begin exploring the opportunities available today.

 

Published in Staffing News