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09 The Growth of IT A Look into the Future of Salary and Demand

Just as technology is constantly evolving, so is the complex IT job market. Knowing the latest hiring, salary, and industry trends can help IT professionals navigate the tech job industry, and be prepared to advance their careers with upcoming opportunities.

The recently released 2015 Modis Salary Guide for Tech Professionals reveals very promising news for tech professionals in the near future, with a look at the overall tech job market as well as the hottest IT careers over the next few years. Here’s what IT pros can look forward to for in-demand jobs with great salaries.

The IT jobs market at a glance

Overall, tech job continue to show rapid growth across multiple sectors. The report from Modis projects that while other industries will experience 10.8 percent employment growth by 2022, IT jobs are expected to show 18 percent growth in the same time period.

In the United States, 685,000 new tech jobs are projected to be added by 2022.

Most in-demand IT jobs

The IT job market is generally growing across all areas, but some sectors are hotter than others. Here are the tech careers that will be the most in demand — and some of the highest paid — over the next few years:

Analysts: Systems analysts jobs are expected to grow 25 percent by 2022. An example of the projected salary in this sector is Business Data Analyst II (mid-level), with a salary range of $55,376 to $86,535, and an average salary of $70,453.

Health IT: The value of the health IT sector is expected to reach $56.7 billion by 2017. Some of the most in-demand jobs for this sector include:

  • Revenue cycle analyst (salary range $36,892 - $71,829; average salary $51,930)
  • Clinical systems analyst (salary range $64,927 - $101,154; average salary $82,454)
  • Clinical informaticist (salary range $42,282 - $74,147; average salary $55,728)

Database development, administration, and business intelligence: With big data becoming a must for many businesses, database and analyst related jobs are projected to show a 15 percent growth by 2022. Positions in high demand include:

  • Data scientist (salary range $79,285 - $138,281; average salary $109,260)
  • Database administrator (salary range $81,497 - $129,993; average salary $107,130)
  • Business intelligence specialist (salary range $88,930 - $137,534; average salary $110,197)

Programming and software engineering: These positions are constantly in demand, and developer jobs are expected to show 22 percent growth by 2022. Some of the top positions for this sector include:

  • Applications engineer, entry level (salary range $45,069 - $80,665; average salary $59,355)
  • Applications engineer, advanced (salary range $86,819 - $156,118; average salary $122,627)
  • Programmer III, mid-level (salary range $71,616 - $111,422; average salary $90,528)
  • Software engineer II, mid-level (salary range $62,811 - $96,472; average salary $78,410)
  • .NET developer (salary range $55,689 - $95,556; average salary $75,995)

Project management: This area has a growth forecast of 15 percent by 2022. Anticipated salaries for project managers include:

  • IT project manager I, entry (salary range $51,173 - $101,266; average salary $76,282)
  • IT project manager III, senior (salary range $81,603 - $129,987; average salary $107,203)

Security: Another area that is always in demand, the growth forecast for security and security analyst jobs is robust at 37 percent by 2022. Some of the most sought-after IT security jobs will include:

  • Security administrator (salary range $50,812 - $108,106; average salary $74,917)
  • Systems security analyst (salary range $62,102 - $111,026; average salary $84,941)
  • Data security manager (salary range $91,305 - $157,778; average salary $115,415)

Web development: High-end web developer positions are projected to grow 20 percent by 2022. The most popular positions in this sector include:

  • Web application developer (salary range $52,462 - $84,613; average salary $66,212)
  • Interface design director (average salary $129,421 - $179,701; average salary $155,669)

Published in Staffing News

Know Your Worth How to Prepare Yourself for Salary Negotiations

 

Whether you’ve been with a company for years or are just accepting a new position, negotiating salary is a tricky prospect. But with a little preparation and the right mindset, you can make the experience far less nerve-wracking — and far more lucrative. Below are a few tips to prepare you to negotiate your salary.

Do your research.

Before starting negotiations, you should know the average salary range for the position. This will give you a solid starting point and show that you have the industry knowledge to back up your income requirement. Always take into account your experience, education, and skill level. If you’re fresh out of college with no experience in the workforce, you’ll likely be on the lower end of that salary range. If you’ve held a similar position for several years or are requesting a raise in your existing job, try to aim for the higher end.

Adjust your mindset.

Many people go into salary negotiations under the mistaken impression that they’re being greedy by requesting a higher salary. While it’s true that you should always be friendly and respectful during these discussions, you should also be assertive. Hiring managers expect you to negotiate, so know your worth and ask for it. You should never be so tied to the outcome of your negotiations that you’re unwilling to take risks. Go into the interview with the knowledge that negotiating your salary is a mutually beneficial partnership with the hiring manager. You aren’t asking for something you don’t deserve.

Practice your tactics.

Always have a strategy in place before you start negotiating. Many recommend that you never give the first number. If the hiring manager pressures you to name a number, try to deflect whenever possible. You can say things like, “What do you think the position is worth?” or refer to your research into the average salary range. Try to get the interviewer to give the first number (it may even be higher than what you were inclined to offer). If they are unwilling to budge on salary, you have other tools at your disposal. You can ask for more vacation days, a flexible bonus structure, relocation fees, or other benefits to compensate for an initially lower salary.

Regardless of the amount, you shouldn’t accept the first offer, especially if it’s lower than what you need or deserve. If necessary, ask for time to think over the offer. If the number is well below your market value, don't be afraid to turn it down. But chances are, if you do your research and determine what your skills and experience are worth, you can come out of the negotiations with a comfortable salary and a strong relationship with your employer.

Published in Recruiting