• Blog

    IT Staffing, Recruiting & Hiring News

Retaining Tech Talent with These Tips

Companies have been struggling with one of the tightest labor markets around. Not only has this made recruitment more challenging, but it has also altered retention. Tech professionals have the ability to explore new opportunities with greater ease and make choices when it comes to selecting an employer. This climate has led many tech pros to keep their options open, particularly if they aren’t thrilled with their current company.

In order to remain competitive, companies need to take extra steps to retain their top tech talent. If you want to make retention a priority, here are some tips you can use right away.

Published in Hiring Managers

Boosting Company Culture in Your Tech Company

When it comes to employees’ job satisfaction and overall happiness, company culture plays a significant role. A great environment enhances engagement and productivity. Similarly, feeling supported and included bolsters morale.

By seizing opportunities to boost your tech company’s culture, you can increase productivity, innovation, and more. Plus, your retention rates will improve, and recruitment may become easier, particularly if the adjustments establish you as an employer of choice.

While shifting the culture of your tech company may seem like a massive undertaking, it doesn’t have to be. By implementing specific strategies, you can create positive change relatively quickly. If you aren’t sure where to begin, here are some tips that can help.

Published in Hiring Managers

Millennial

 

Many companies speak about Millennials as if they are fundamentally different than other employees, as though their needs and desires from their employer don’t resemble anything familiar. But members of the largest generation in the workforce actually want exactly what older generations do, they just aren’t as willing to tolerate slights when they occur.

 

So, if you want to retain more Millennials at your business, here’s what you need to do.

Subjectivity and Work Processes

Few employees quit their companies; they quit their bosses. But the root cause isn’t always the manager. Subjectivity in work processes leads to disconnects, and these disconnects are the source of the problem.

 

So, what is subjectivity in work processes? It’s when the provided instructions or institutional policies are open to interpretation. How tasks are accomplished, what steps are required, and which outcomes are considered proper aren’t clearly defined. And, if an employee and a manager interpret these processes differently, then it opens the door for conflict.

 

For example, the concept of being a team player is ambiguous. But, if a boss doesn’t consider an employee to be a team player, even if the employee thinks they are operating fine as part of the team, it creates a point of contention that is challenging to address. If your Millennial workforce isn’t able to understand why their manager sees an issue with their performance, they may choose to leave simply because the problem can’t be well articulated, making resolutions difficult to identify.

 

The issue of subjectivity can apply to any process that isn’t well defined, including those surrounding promotions, pay raises and accessing various internal opportunities. And, the resulting conflicts, will cost you in the Millennial retention game.

How to Remove the Source of Conflict

If your goal is to keep more Millennials on staff, then it is important to eliminate subjectivity wherever it resides. Examine key processes to identify missing steps or poorly defined requirements, working to replace them with more concrete instruction that isn’t as open to interpretation.

 

At times, this can be as simple as reassessing your language choices within processes. Take the time to make sure all procedures and policies are precise and relate it to observable action.

 

If conflicts do arise, consider it an opportunity to examine the source of the issue and not necessarily how the situation has played out. Examine any applicable procedures involved in the conflict and see if the resulting issue is based on a lack of clarity instead of intentionally defiance. It’s highly possible your Millennial worker followed the procedure based on their interpretation, and that just didn’t match up with the manager’s understanding of the policy in question.

 

While it can take time to review every procedure for ambiguity, it is a critical step for improving your retention efforts. If you are looking for more tips about retaining Millennials or are searching for new employees to join your teams, let the professionals at The Armada Group put their experience to work for you. Contact us to discuss your current hiring and retention plan, and see how our services can help you reach your goals.

 

Published in Recruiting

11 New Ways to Improve the Way You Hire IT Pros

It's been said so often that it's become a cliché: Every business is a software business.

That means that when you're hiring tech talent, you aren't competing for employees just against other companies in your industry. You're competing against every company in America. Coming out on top in that competition means getting smart about your approach to hiring. Here are 11 tips to help you hire faster and hire better.

Know why you're hiring.

Have a rock-solid, detailed job description, and be clear about which skills the new employee needs to have and the skills you want them to have. And while tech hiring is often about checking off acronyms and buzzwords, know what results you want the new hire to be able to deliver, not just which languages they need to be able to code in.

Help candidates be prepared for the interview.

Tests like asking candidates to open a nailed-shut window are almost totally inappropriate for hiring technical employees, but candidates will be stressed even without a stress test. Help reduce their stress so they can present themselves comfortably by making sure they know what to expect before they arrive.

Read the resume before the interview.

You can tell when a candidate doesn't research the company before the interview and it doesn't leave a good impression. Similarly, it doesn't make a good impression with the candidate if you're clearly scanning their resume for the first time while they're sitting across from you. Remember, they're evaluating you while you're evaluating them. So read their resume and check out their Linked In or Facebook profiles before you meet the candidate.

Treat it as a conversation, not an interrogation.

Yes, you need to know about the candidate's abilities and interests, but that doesn't mean you should bombard them with one question after another. Make sure the candidate has a chance to respond and ask their own questions.

Be prepared to be spontaneous.

If you've understood the requirements of the job and reviewed the candidate's resume, you should have a list of questions prepared. Make sure you ask all the necessary questions, but don't be afraid to go off script. Follow up on things the candidate says that intrigue you.

Allow the candidate room to talk.

Give candidates time to respond in detail to your questions. The interview process is about their answers, after all, so unless there's a real time crunch and some questions are mandatory, give them room to provide full explanations.

Pay attention.

When you're interviewing multiple candidates, especially on a single day, it's easy to start tuning out in the middle of the interview and thinking about the other things you need to accomplish. Avoid these distracting thoughts by planning your day around the interview rather than squeezing it into a jam-packed schedule.

Interviews shouldn't be Pass/Fail.

You're trying to hire the best candidate for the job, not just an adequate candidate for the job. Don't simply consider whether the candidate is acceptable; evaluate them in depth to be able to compare multiple candidates and find the best fit.

Let the candidate know what happens next.

Remember, you probably aren't the only company the candidate is interviewing with. Let the candidate know how long it will take to hear from you. That way, they'll know whether they should wait, get back in touch with you, or jump on another offer they've received.

Give every candidate a final Yes or No.

The candidate took time out of their day to come meet you. They deserve the courtesy of a final answer, whether to make an offer or decline to hire them.

Work with a top-tier recruiting firm.

You'll minimize the pain of the hiring process and make it far more efficient if you work with an experienced recruiting firm that can identify potential candidates and meaningfully prescreen them. The Armada Group has more than 20 years experience placing top talent in the technology industry. Contact us to learn how our skilled recruiters can help you hire faster and better.

Published in Recruiting

Make Hiring from a Competitor Less Risky

Information technology is a competitive business. Companies compete for funding, for sales, and for employees. Because top tech talent is in short supply, sometimes the best hire is working for your competition. If you do steal someone away, make sure your theft is legal.

Take the Employee's Talent, Not Their Employer's Trade Secrets

You should be aiming to gain competitive advantage from the employee's special skills and knowledge, not from their inside information about their former employer's business plans. Trade secrets are protected by law, even if the employee hasn't signed a nondisclosure agreement.

It's important to make sure any ideas the employee brings with them are original and can't be claimed by their current employer. Some employment contracts give ownership of ideas, even if they were developed on personal time or seem unrelated to the company's line of business.

Make Sure the Employee Can Work For You

Some employees are under noncompete agreements with their employer. While courts don't always uphold these agreements if they're challenged, you should consider the consequences of a potential fight before hiring the employee.  Litigation can be expensive, even if you win. Court battles require time as well as money, so the employee's contributions may be limited until the case is settled.

Ask about any other agreements the employee signed. In addition to non compete agreements, nondisclosure, nonsolicitation, confidentiality, and other clauses may affect the ability of the employee to perform the services you want.

Make a Clean Break

Under some circumstances, it may be possible to work with the current employer to ensure that the employee doesn't bring over any materials. The current employer can designate a monitor to document that only personal items are removed from the premises and that all required corporate material was returned. This can eliminate the basis for claims of trade secret thefts later. If possible, you can structure the new employee's responsibilities to reduce the possibility of disclosing confidential information.

Consult Your Attorney

The best way to make sure your hiring the competitor's employee is within the law is to consult an attorney prior to offering a position to them. Make sure you and your legal advisor review all employment agreements signed by the employee with their current employer. Once you understand the commitments they've made, you'll be able to determine whether there are any risks in hiring them and if those risks are worth taking.

Published in Recruiting