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Tips for Using Data to Increase Your Business Productivity

Thanks largely to digital transformation initiative and the massive influx of data companies can access, organizations have the ability to optimize operations and enhance productivity. However, this can only occur when data is harnessed in the correct fashion. Not all of the collected information has value when it comes to increasing efficiency and the quality of outputs. As a result, companies need to look in the right areas if improving productivity is the goal.

There are More Jobs in the Bay Area Than Ever

The Bay Area is known as a major technology center, and it continues to be part of a major tech boom. Tech employment in the region continues to grow rapidly, far outpacing other sectors and reaching record highs, even when compared to the dot-com era. Additionally, the San Francisco-San Mateo area is grabbing a bigger piece of the technology pie thanks to the unprecedented surge.

Published in Staffing News

The Gender Diversity Issue in the Data Science Industry Remains Large

Data science is essentially a fledgling field. As a result, many companies struggle to find the talent they need, causing them to focus purely on recruitment at-large. However, this mindset may be harming gender diversity in the candidate pools.

Published in Recruiting

When a team is highly engaged, they outperform their less-engaged counterparts, typically by a wide margin. Managers are usually aware that happy employees are more productive, which is what makes managing morale so important.

While boosting morale can seem like a tricky undertaking, there are simple steps that can make a significant impact. If you want to boost team morale over the long-term, here are some tips to follow.

Published in Hiring Managers

Why is Data Engineering a Top Trending Job in 2019

 

Data engineering has been a top trending job for some time. In 2019, companies continue to seek out professionals for data engineering positions. According to one study, there was an 88.3 percent increase in the number of job postings featuring the phrase “data engineer” over a 12-month period. As a result, data engineer is considered the top trending job so far this year.

If you are wondering why data engineering remained in the top spot, here’s what you need to know.

Published in Staffing News
Tuesday, Jan 05 2016

10 Interview Tips for 2016

10 Interview Tips for 2016

Going to be looking for a new job in the new year? Update your resume and brush up on your interviewing skills with these 10 tips:

1. Have good manners.

Be nice to everyone you meet during the hiring process, including the administrative assistants who schedule the interviews and bring you into the office. Even if the hiring process doesn't formally solicit their feedback, you can be sure any bad impression you make on them will find its way back to the hiring manager.

2. Don't focus solely on technology.

If you're interviewing for a leadership or managerial role, your job is more about people than tech. If you are looking for a technical job, you'll have to interact with co-workers and colleagues in other business departments. If you make it clear you enjoy those interactions, you'll appear more flexible than someone who wants to keep their head down and just code.

3. Be ready to explain how you'd get started.

Companies are often hiring because they have an urgent need. Be ready to explain how your skills, background, and approach will let you hit the ground running.

4. Dress appropriately.

It's rare to need a suit and tie when interviewing for a technical position, but you should still bump your style up a notch. In some startups, casual, even sloppy, dress may still be appropriate for an interview, but even if you're rumpled, you need to be clean.

5. Be ready to show your portfolio.

Particularly for positions that emphasize creativity, such as user interface design roles, you may be asked to show samples of your work. Be mindful of any confidentiality or nondisclosure agreements you have with your current employer, but bring examples of your work when possible. (Don’t force an uninterested interviewer to look at it, however!)

6. Be ready to ask questions.

You can plan questions in advance based on information you gather about the company online, but you'll make an even better impression if you ask relevant questions about the specific opportunity that relate to information the interviewer gave you.

7. Indicate your interest in continuing development.

No one can afford to stop learning, whether in a technical or managerial role. Express your interest in continuing to develop your capabilities, including technical and leadership skills, and the company will know that your value to them won't end just because a technology becomes obsolete.

8. Have your references ready.

Companies expect that you'll be able to provide references; not having a list of names handy makes you seem unprepared and can raise suspicions that you don't have anyone who will vouch for you. Make sure you let your references know you'll be giving their information out and they are willing to respond on your behalf.

9. Rehearse.

You don't want to give canned answers to interview questions, but you don't want to ramble, either. Anticipate what you may be asked and think about your answers in advance. You can't anticipate specific technical questions, but you can brush up on the relevant technologies to refresh your memory.

10. Remember the evaluation process goes both ways.

Interviewing isn't just about you impressing the company; the company also needs to impress you. Pay attention to the facilities and people you see; do you think you'd fit in and enjoy working here? That's the most important interview question of all.

Published in Recruiting

What to Wear to an Interview with an IT Recruiter

It used to be simple to decide what to wear to an interview. A business suit was appropriate for both men and women. Almost no technical jobs require wearing a suit at work, though; some offices are casual enough for jeans and sneakers, or even shorts in the summertime. And when you're interviewing with a recruiter, you aren't interviewing with the employer, anyway. So exactly how do you dress for meeting a recruiter?

The key is to remember you're trying to convince the recruiter to pass you up the hiring chain and get you an interview with the company. They'll ask about your technical skills, but recruiters aren't able to judge the depth of your knowledge. Instead (and this isn't disparaging their skills) they need to make judgments based on non-technical factors. Your ability to present yourself well, which includes your body language, speaking ability, and, yes, how you dress is key to succeeding at this meeting.

Dress to Impress Anywhere

Because the recruiter may have positions available at multiple companies, you can't easily tailor your outfit to match the norms at a specific employer. The best choice is to wear something that would be appropriate at almost any employer. This means smart business casual or a suit. The more senior the position you're aiming for, the more formal your outfit should be. You can use an accessory or two to show your personal style, but tilt conservative.

For any interview, whether with a recruiter or an employer, make sure everything is clean and neatly pressed. It's best not to wear something brand new, though. You want to be sure there won't be any problems, like the fabric making you itchy and uncomfortable. That physical discomfort can translate into odd mannerisms or facial expressions during the interview.

Ask the Recruiter's Advice

When you meet with the recruiter, it doesn't hurt to ask them about the dress code at the employer and how you should dress for your interview there. The recruiter wants you to succeed and get the job, and they'll give you the best advice to help make that happen.

Published in Recruiting

personality over skills

In the IT job market, your technical abilities can often be the be-all and end-all. The idea often seems to be that if you don’t meet the long list of necessary skills, you simply aren’t the right person for the position. However, this isn’t always the case. For many hiring managers, certain aspects of your personality may actually be more important than skills you’ve picked up along the way.

Below are a few examples of soft skills that may land you that IT dream job, and why hiring managers may choose them over more technical capabilities.

Willingness (and Ability) to Learn

A thirst for knowledge is a highly sought-after character trait in any industry, but it can go a long way in tech. You may not have mastered PHP or networking just yet, but if you have a voracious appetite for new information, you may find that hiring managers are willing to teach you the necessary skills. Quick learners are often a worthwhile investment, as they tend to stay on top of their skills and constantly refresh and update their knowledge base.

Enthusiasm

Passion and motivation can be invaluable for IT companies, particularly startups and those who specialize in innovative technology. Hiring someone who’s emotionally invested in their finished product will improve both the quality of their work and their drive to complete it. An infectiously enthusiastic personality can also impact the morale of co-workers, creating a more effective (and happy) workforce overall.

Self-Direction

In tech, it’s often expected that you be capable of a certain degree of autonomy. No matter how advanced your skills are, it simply isn’t worth the investment if your manager has to hold your hand through every project. A candidate who possesses self-drive, on the other hand, will not only be able to complete tasks on their own, but will be able to occupy themselves with meaningful work when they aren’t given explicit direction.

Ambition

A desire to succeed in your industry can be very appealing to hiring managers. This soft skill often translates into intuitive insight into what’s best for the company, granting you the opportunity to impress your managers with the added benefit of improving your place of work. Ambitious candidates are also fiercely competitive, and this competitiveness can inspire your team to work harder, particularly when you’re incentivized by upper management.

These are just a few examples of personality traits that hiring managers may prioritize over technical capabilities. Don’t let the fact that your skill sets don’t perfectly align with the position’s requirements discourage you from applying. You may find yourself pleasantly surprised by how valuable your soft skills really are.

Published in Hiring Managers
Thursday, May 07 2015

Top Tech Priorities for CIOs

tech priorities cios

Chief Information Officers are evolving with their industry. As they develop a deeper understanding of new technologies, they adapt their strategies and restructure their priorities to reflect emerging trends. Regardless of their industry, many CIOs have similar tech goals. These are just a few of their core priorities in 2015.

Real-Time Data

As we develop more and more tools to collect customer data, we come face-to-face with how truly massive that data actually is. Big data is quickly closing in on zettabyte territory, and we have to address how we’re processing it, rather than how we’re collecting it. Many CIOs are turning to real-time data through updated analytics. This intuitive model will allow you to change what the customer or client sees and experiences as you learn about them.

Data Security

 A high degree of sensitivity is required when handling the amount of user data that many CIOs encounter on a daily basis. The risks involved with this level of information are tremendous, so you not only have to contend with outside threats, but also the fine line of acceptable use of customer information. Abuse of personal data can not only damage a company’s reputation, it can actually result in costly lawsuits. As a result, CIOs often prioritize data sensitivity and security on their list of tech concerns.

Cloud Services

In past years, cloud services were considered an emerging technology that required a certain level of boldness to adopt. However, perspectives have shifted and the cloud is now a leading priority for CIOs. It’s been a slow process, but every year more major companies invest in this technology. With benefits like improved scalability, reduced costs, and a more efficient infrastructure, it’s no surprise that cloud services are spearheading advancements in the tech industry.

Mobile

An ever-growing number of customers are interacting with companies from mobile devices. As a result, it’s never been more important to engage with them on a playing field they understand. By prioritizing mobile technologies, CIOs open new connections between their business and the people they’re trying to reach. No matter the industry, or whether the company is B2B or B2C, the benefit of mobile connection is extremely powerful.

The momentum of these new technologies is growing with every year, and a tech-savvy CIO will choose to prioritize these emerging trends. This will not only grant access to the myriad of benefits that come with advanced technology, but it will also allow your business to compete in the global marketplace.


Published in Recruiting

evolution virtual technologies

In 2014, VMware was ranked ninth on Forbes’ “Most Innovative Companies” list, but this hasn’t stopped new developments in virtualization from rapidly closing the gap between VMware’s software suite and heavy hitters like OpenStack or CloudStack. These evolving technologies may actually come to replace VMware’s niche software as more and more customers opt for these newer stacks. But before we look at where this technology is going, let’s look at where it’s been.

Virtual Stacks: Origins

VMware was designed to meet specific needs of CIOs during the rise of virtualization. The businesses these CIOs and managers represented had applications or software packages that were never designed for virtualization, and at its most basic level, VMware’s purpose was to address this cultural shift in the tech industry. Once corporations were on board, more features were added to advance the technology.

Its origins, however, made VMware a very niche product. It was designed for enterprise-level customers, and others found themselves left out in the cold. OpenStack and CloudStack, on the other hand, were created to address a different need: the increased dependency of VMware on traditional uses. There are strengths to all three, but many innovative companies are drawn to these newer, more flexible technologies. So why exactly is VMware being replaced?

VMware vs. OpenStack vs. CloudStack

VMware comes with a rich legacy of established features and a strong support community, as well as a full suite of virtualization software. That being said, it’s a closed system, so there’s very little flexibility or room for creativity. In every aspect of the tech industry, experts are finding themselves drawn to open source technology like its two competitors. The ability to customize solutions, innovate your system, and collaborate with big-name companies to improve the software is more exciting than tradition.

Then there’s the matter of price. VMware can be relatively expensive, but it’s easier to install and get off the ground. OpenStack and CloudStack are free, but require a team of engineers to get it up and running (which can translate into higher initial costs). However, VMware comes with hefty licensing fees, so once you’ve covered the initial cost of OpenStack or CloudStack deployment, your price tag will begin to taper down over time. As a long-term solution, open source virtualization software may actually be the more cost effective means of achieving your goals.

Between the two VMware competitors, OpenStack has a better track record with large, well-known companies and a healthier reputation. As a result, it tends to take the lead as the most mature choice among open source virtualization technologies. With these attractive alternatives to VMware’s traditional infrastructure, it may come as no surprise that these new software packages are quickly taking the lead in virtualization technology.

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