Python Skills

 

Technology has made it easier for companies to secure talent from across the country, and even the world. Hiring remote employees can provide a lot of advantages, including locating hard to find skills and saving money on physical office space.

 

However, building trust with your remote workforce can be a challenge, largely because it requires a different management approach than you may use in the office. Managers often worry that remote employees aren’t doing their fair share and workers may not feel connected to the team, increasing feelings of isolation or fears that they are out of the loop.

 

Luckily, there are things you can do to increase trust with your remote employees. Here are three tips to get you started.

 

  1. Create a Communication Plan

Regular communication is crucial if you want to increase trust. Often, the best way to ensure that everyone is communicating often enough is to craft a schedule. For example, daily 10-minute progress meetings can help keep you up to date while allowing the employee to request additional information or guidance. Video conferences can provide everyone with face time, increasing the sense of connection.

 

Similarly, providing your entire team access to an instant messaging system can facilitate quick conversations, making project planning and information sharing simpler. Plus, many solutions allow for document sharing and multiple chat rooms, adding to overall efficiency.

 

  1. Use Outcome-Based Goals

When it comes to managing a remote workforce, outcomes are usually more important that the amount of time they spend working. If you set outcome-based goals and fully define the employee’s responsibilities, you ensure that your expectations are clear.

 

Put the goals in writing and use them to monitor the worker’s progress. Make sure the employee is completely aware of what you expect, and use your regular check-in meetings to request updates.

 

  1. Provide the Right Tools

Remote workers need a range of technologies to be effective in their role. Aside from the above-mentioned communication platform, they may need access to other software or cloud-based resources to manage their tasks. VPN services may also be necessary, particularly if your employee needs to remote into your internal network.

 

Additionally, helping them acquire items to create a comfortable workstation at their location can be beneficial, as well as technology like computers, scanners, printers, and whatever else they need to do their job.

 

Ultimately, building trust with your remote employees doesn’t have to be a challenge. By following the tips above, you can create pathways for regular communication, ensure that your expectations are clear, and that your workforce has all of the tools they need to excel in their role.

 

If you are interested in learning more about managing remote workers or are looking for skilled professionals to join your company, the team at The Armada Group can help. Contact us to discuss your unique goals with one of our knowledgeable staff members today and see how our services and expertise can benefit you.

 

 

Published in Staffing News

4 Tips for Managing a Remote IT Team

It's common these days for IT teams to have team members in multiple locations around the world, whether to take advantage of specialized talent or cost factors. Technology helps these scattered teams communicate, but there are still challenges that come when co-workers aren't co-located. Here are four tips for managers to help their remote teams work effectively.

Plan ahead

Projects always work more efficiently when there's a plan, and planning is even more critical with remote staff. There are fewer opportunities for casual interactions and questions to clarify assignments, and if confusion crosses time zones, delays can extend for days. Make sure you have a plan, so everyone knows what they're expected to do and when it needs to be done.

Schedule time to communicate

Because team members don't see you in person on a regular basis, they don't often get a lot of feedback. Don't rely on email; it's not dynamic enough, and meaning doesn't always come through. Plan a regular virtual meeting, perhaps once a month, to meet with your remote staff and give development guidance and other feedback. When possible, use videoconferencing, not just audio, so facial expressions and other non-verbal feedback are part of the communication process.

Build processes and systems to support the team

When people are in the same place, you may not need formal processes to address issues that arise; casual communication and spur-of-the-moment working sessions help sort things out. When people are around the world, a formally defined process ensures that everyone knows how to raise concerns, and that everyone is able to contribute input to solutions.

Build team spirit

Remote teams still want to feel like part of the team. Make sure remote staff are included in team celebrations. If possible, have managers visit the remote site periodically, and bring senior members of the remote staff for working visits to the home office. Besides providing an opportunity to build a shared work culture, these out-of-office experiences allow you to get to know remote staff as individuals and treat them as the unique people they are.

Published in IT Infrastructure