The Questions that Management Should be Asking Their Employees

Employee engagement surveys have become increasingly common. In most cases, companies include questions that allow them to gauge how workers feel about their positions, managers, or the organization. They may ask if the employee thinks they are receiving enough recognition or if they have a best friend at work.

Published in Hiring Managers

5 Tips to Lead Your Team to Success in the New Year

The new year signals both a time for reflection and a time for planning. By making the right moves now, you can make the most of the season and set your team up for success. If you don’t know where to begin, here are five tips that can help you lead your staff into a bright future.

Published in Hiring Managers

How to Answer Why Did You Leave Your Last IT Job

Some interview questions are unique. "If you could have any superpower, what would it be?"

Some interview questions are routine. "Why did you leave your last job?"

Despite their being so different in form, both questions have a common purpose. They are meant to help the interviewer understand your motivations and desires and to help them judge whether you will fit in.

Questions like the first are hard to prepare for – they're so non-standard, they're unexpected, and it's hard to know how someone will react to anything you say – but there's no excuse for not being prepared for the second. Your answer has to be fact-based (because a potential employer can verify your answer), it needs to feel truthful to you (so you can state it with confidence), and it needs to reassure the interviewer that your rationale for leaving was appropriate.

No matter what your reason for leaving was, there are ways to shape your answer to this question that make it positive. Use the following examples as a guideline for answering this question:

I was laid off. The company had layoffs, and unfortunately I was one of the people who were affected.

I was bored. I went into the job hoping to accomplish A,B,C (or learn X,Y,Z), and I was able to do that. Now I'm looking for a role where I can achieve D,E,F (or work with technology Q,R,S).

There was too much production support. The company had a lot of other issues that kept us from focusing on building the product.

Politics got in the way. I'm really excited by the opportunity to develop and ship a product. Because of management changes at my former employer, we weren't able to focus on delivery.

It was disappointing in every way imaginable and I escaped as fast as I could. I knew very quickly that the situation wasn't the right fit for me. I could have stayed but I wouldn't have been doing my best, which wasn't fair to either me or my employer. By moving on, I can find a position where I can contribute fully, and they can find an employee who will contribute what they need.

Published in Recruiting

Why Businesses are Turning to Managed IT Services

For most companies, technology isn't a core part of their services. Even for companies that create tech products, running a data center and supporting general-purpose business applications isn't a core competency. Now that cloud computing has made the idea of running business applications off-site acceptable, more businesses are turning to managed service providers (MSPs) to provide basic services like email, backups, and monitoring.

The benefits of using MSPs are several:

• Staff is freed up for more important functions.

Most businesses would prefer IT staff to work on strategic projects rather than housekeeping functions. Offloading that work to an MSP lets internal resources be allocated more efficiently.

• There are cost savings.

Running a data center is expensive. Even just the energy costs for email servers are significant. Using an MSP reduces or eliminates many of these costs. Monthly charges are fixed and not subject to fluctuation that impacts cashflows.

• Information security is enhanced.

MSPs often have more expertise in data security than the company that originates the data. Because they handle these services for numerous customers, they have access to skills and knowledge other companies lack. Because many threats to data security come from internal users, having the physical servers and storage devices off-site and managed by non-employees surprisingly increases physical security.

• Adhering to compliance standards is easier.

Firms have to meet many standards regarding handling sensitive information, especially in financial and health-related businesses. Many MSPs specialize in these areas and have appropriate certifications and processes in place. It's easier for businesses to leverage the MSP’s certified data center than to build their own.

• Super support.

MSPs provide support around the clock. Their staff will be ready to recover systems as soon as an incident is noted. MSPs have advanced monitoring tools in place to detect and alert on any infrastructure problems. Solid backup practices ensure that data can be recovered and business continuity guaranteed even after a systems failure.

• They're ready for the future.

MSPs keep systems up to date with all mandatory patches. They're also aware of upcoming upgrades and technical changes, and can work with a business as a partner to develop a technology strategy. Leveraging expert knowledge may be the best reason companies turn to MSPs.

Published in Hiring Managers