Tuesday, May 14 2013

How to Turn Off an IT Hiring Manager

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Red flags to avoid

You have finally scheduled an interview for the position you’re hoping for, but you’re far from the finish line. The hiring manager has clearly reviewed your resume and expressed interest in your as a candidate, so a strong interview could be the last hurdle before you land your new job. While the basics of interviewing can be easily accomplished—don’t be late, dress professionally, and so on—there are more subtle actions and phrases that can turn off an IT hiring manager. Don’t fall prey to these common mistakes.

Mistake #1: Not doing your homework on the company you are interviewing with

Just because you’re the perfect fit for the position description doesn’t mean you’re right for the company, or that it’s right for you. It’s an embarrassment, to say the least, to go into an interview and be asked a question like “What 3 things did you learn about our company from our website?” and not being able to articulate an educated answer. A hiring manager can immediately tell if you haven’t done your research—if you aren’t willing to invest time to learn about the company beforehand, they’ll likely assume you won’t after being hired.

Mistake #2: Failing to listen actively

Interviews are your opportunity to present yourself and your qualifications. That doesn’t let you off the hook for listening to what the hiring manager is saying—and if you don’t breathe long enough to actively focus on what you’re being told, you’ll be on your way posthaste. Active listening goes beyond simply hearing words, and requires digesting and responding to what’s being said. Without it, you can’t connect with the hiring manager, and they’re likely to not value your input since you don’t value theirs.

Mistake #3: Being a Robot

The ability to work as a team is important, and a hiring manager will likely make sure you have that experience before taking you on. However, it’s possible to be TOO team-oriented in your interview, to your own detriment. If you consistently talk about “we”—as in “we took this approach”; “we implemented this software solution to solve X”—you run the risk of appearing to be an insignificant contributor to the initiative. It’s a fine line: don’t act like you single-handedly delivered a 50 person, 25 man-year project; at the same time, make sure the hiring manager knows your specific contributions to a successful outcome.

Mistake #4: Giving robotic answers

One of the biggest turn-offs for a hiring manager is when an interviewee fails to present herself as an individual, with specific talents and expertise. This goes beyond setting yourself apart from the “we” of your team, and involves telling detailed stories and real-world practical answers from your past. If all you offer is methodology, you’ll be perceived as no different than any other potential employee. It’s the specific facets of how you approach your work that will set you apart.

Become a shoe-in

Obviously, you want to make a lasting, positive impression at your interview. By learning as much as possible up-front about the company, actively paying attention to the conversation with the hiring manager, asserting your initiative as well as collaborative skills, and focusing on your qualities in addition to book smarts, you’ll position yourself as someone to keep an eye on—and, better yet, someone to hire.

 

If you are looking for top IT positions in California you need to be prepared for the interviewm. Let The Armada Group help you develop a job search strategy, and land you an interview with your ideal company.