Items filtered by date: June 2018

Python Skills

 

Technology has made it easier for companies to secure talent from across the country, and even the world. Hiring remote employees can provide a lot of advantages, including locating hard to find skills and saving money on physical office space.

 

However, building trust with your remote workforce can be a challenge, largely because it requires a different management approach than you may use in the office. Managers often worry that remote employees aren’t doing their fair share and workers may not feel connected to the team, increasing feelings of isolation or fears that they are out of the loop.

 

Luckily, there are things you can do to increase trust with your remote employees. Here are three tips to get you started.

 

  1. Create a Communication Plan

Regular communication is crucial if you want to increase trust. Often, the best way to ensure that everyone is communicating often enough is to craft a schedule. For example, daily 10-minute progress meetings can help keep you up to date while allowing the employee to request additional information or guidance. Video conferences can provide everyone with face time, increasing the sense of connection.

 

Similarly, providing your entire team access to an instant messaging system can facilitate quick conversations, making project planning and information sharing simpler. Plus, many solutions allow for document sharing and multiple chat rooms, adding to overall efficiency.

 

  1. Use Outcome-Based Goals

When it comes to managing a remote workforce, outcomes are usually more important that the amount of time they spend working. If you set outcome-based goals and fully define the employee’s responsibilities, you ensure that your expectations are clear.

 

Put the goals in writing and use them to monitor the worker’s progress. Make sure the employee is completely aware of what you expect, and use your regular check-in meetings to request updates.

 

  1. Provide the Right Tools

Remote workers need a range of technologies to be effective in their role. Aside from the above-mentioned communication platform, they may need access to other software or cloud-based resources to manage their tasks. VPN services may also be necessary, particularly if your employee needs to remote into your internal network.

 

Additionally, helping them acquire items to create a comfortable workstation at their location can be beneficial, as well as technology like computers, scanners, printers, and whatever else they need to do their job.

 

Ultimately, building trust with your remote employees doesn’t have to be a challenge. By following the tips above, you can create pathways for regular communication, ensure that your expectations are clear, and that your workforce has all of the tools they need to excel in their role.

 

If you are interested in learning more about managing remote workers or are looking for skilled professionals to join your company, the team at The Armada Group can help. Contact us to discuss your unique goals with one of our knowledgeable staff members today and see how our services and expertise can benefit you.

 

 

Published in Staffing News

React Engineering

 

When it comes to tech, which skills are considered to be in-demand can seemingly change on a dime. While options like Tableau and Linux were once popular with employers, interest in these skills diminished significantly during 2017.

 

However, as one skill becomes less coveted, others rise to take their place. In 2018, React, the JavaScript library commonly used in the creation of user interfaces, is what has the attention of employers.

 

React Engineering of the Rise

Over the course of two years, employer interest in React has skyrocketed, based on a recent study. Job site Indeed examined two periods, October 2015 through September 2016 and October 2016 through September 2017, and found that the number of companies seeking out React skills rose by 229 percent.

 

That level of growth far outpaced other in-demand skills, including Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Azure at 40 percent and 62 percent respectively.

 

Another point that spurs growth is the amount of developer interest in React. Many coders appreciate its simplicity and flexibility, often leading them to consider React to be one of their favorite library options.

 

While developer support doesn’t guarantee employer buy-in, it can have an impact. As more coders touted Reacts benefits and began using the library in their work, the level of prevalence increased, leading companies to experience the benefits and start seeking out others who could work with React.

 

 

Why is React Popular with Employers?

React was developed by Facebook, a giant in the social media space. That fact alone should stand as a testament to React’s capabilities in the front-end development arena. However, the number of big name companies that embrace React doesn’t stop there. Dropbox, Expedia, Netflix, The New York Times, and Reddit all use React in some capacity, showcasing just how many organizations have shifted to the library.

 

Overall, React is highly adaptable, adjusting the renderings as new data is provided or current data changes. It also provides for a substantial amount of customization and offers a significant amount of functionality. Further, React works with a broad selection of frameworks, making it incredibly flexible too.

 

Additionally, thanks to React Native, mobile development can also be more straightforward from a company perspective. Since the transition from the web-oriented React to React Native is fairly easy to handle for most developers, this allows organizations to secure talent that has the potential to create designs in both web and mobile formats.

 

Ultimately, Reach provides a significant number of benefits and it is becoming more widely used. This increases employer interest in React, leading to additional opportunities for those interested in React engineering.

 

If you are looking for a new position, the skilled professionals at The Armada Group can help you explore opportunities in the area. Contact us to discuss your career goals with one of our experienced recruiters today and see how our services can benefit you.

 

 

Millenials

 

Every generation is unique, particularly when it comes to the values they hold dear and common behaviors, such as how they prefer to communicate. While certain traits typically associated with Millennials should be considered strengths, others make actually hold you back as you work to forge a career in tech.

 

If you are a Millennial tech pro and are wondering if some of the characteristics of your generation are holding your career back, here’s what you need to know.

 

Hard Work Doesn’t Guarantee Anything

Many members of the Millennial generation were raised to believe that by working hard their employer will take care of them. This leads many Millennial tech pros to put nearly all of the energy into work in hopes that it will help them get ahead. However, that doesn’t necessarily transpire.

 

When the hard work doesn’t pay off in the way they expect, many Millennials become frustrated and disappointed. However, many fail to realize that there are other mechanisms that control raises and promotions, particularly at large tech firms.

 

While being a diligent employee is certainly smart from a career perspective, it’s unwise to assume that a company will automatically reward you for your efforts beyond your current paycheck. Millennials need to, instead, learn to navigate the organization or larger industry. This can include anything from discussing what it takes to get a raise or promotion with a manager or seeking out new opportunities outside of the company.

 

 

Focusing on Happiness Can be a Mistake

Many Millennials bounce from one job to the next in hopes of finding a role that makes them happy. However, the misconception that work should be fun can hinder their careers.

 

Ultimately, as the old adage goes, if work was fun, then companies wouldn’t have to pay people to do the job. While it isn’t impossible to be happy at work, seeking out situations that provide a sense of contentment or an environment they find generally pleasant would be a better approach.

 

Typically, in a suitable job, some fun will certainly be had, but it isn’t going to be the standard. By lowering this expectation to simple contentment, it can help a position feel more satisfying. Plus, it is a much more realistic goal, which can alleviate the stress of chasing something that may be impossible to find.

 

Still Relying on the Traditional Career Ladder

Millennials were often raised by parents who could clearly map out their future thanks to traditional career ladders. This leads many of Gen Y to assume that similar paths are still available today, but that isn’t always the case.

 

Modern workplaces rely less on standard transitions from one rung to the next. Instead, employees are rewarded for accomplishments, acquiring new skills, and blazing their own trails.

 

While certain progression patterns still exist, the path between point A and point B isn’t as defined. As a Millennial tech pro, if you want to move your career forward, you have to take control of your career by seeking out new opportunities and not just waiting for them to simply appear at your feet.

 

If you are ready to take the next step forward in your career, the professionals at The Armada Group can connect you to exciting opportunities throughout the area. Contact us to discuss your goals today and see how our services can help you reach them.

 

 

Published in Staffing News

Interview Questions

 

Whether you are applying to an IT job or a position with a tech company, you typically expect to be asked certain technical questions. After all, they either apply to the role itself or the organization’s business model, so these inquiries have an innate level of relevancy.

 

However, it isn’t uncommon to be asked non-tech questions as well. Typically, questions that fall outside of the tech landscape serve a critical purpose in assessing whether you are a strong fit for the position or the company as a whole.

 

Even tech giants like Google and Amazon branch into non-tech areas, regardless of whether the position is tech-oriented. If you are wondering why they ask their candidates these non-tech job interview questions, here’s what you need to know.

 

Soft Skill Assessments

Communication skills, problem-solving capabilities, and leadership potential are often highly relevant to nearly every company, regardless of the position itself or their industry. Hiring managers will often ask non-tech questions that help them assess a candidate’s soft skills as a means of determining whether the job seeker possesses the right mix to be successful in the role.

 

For example, if you are asked for an example of a time when you used data to make actionable recommendations (something Amazon has been known to do), the hiring manager is looking for insight into your analytical skills and how you use them to benefit the company.

 

Similarly, being asked how you would prioritize or choose from assignments from multiple leaders in the organization gives the hiring manager information about how you assess your skills, any preferences you may have, and how you approach challenging situations involving workplace dynamics.

 

Since soft skills are incredibly valuable assets, hiring managers want to know which you possess and how you use them to be effective in a position, and non-tech questions are a common approach for making these assessments.

 

 

Cultural Fit

When it comes to determining whether a candidate fits into a company’s cultural, tech questions aren’t always ideal. Instead, hiring managers use non-tech questions to assess whether the environment is right for you.

 

For instance, questions about your preferred management style can let them know if you would thrive or struggle under the position’s manager. Asking you to describe an ideal physical environment helps them ascertain whether the workplace itself matches your preferences.

 

Similarly, requests for examples of how you function as part of a team provide powerful insights into how you work in group scenarios and whether your approach would mesh with your coworkers.

 

Ultimately, non-tech questions help the hiring manager get to know you beyond your technical capabilities. Since cultural fit and soft skills are so important in every workplace, it’s wise to anticipate that you’ll face similar questions yourself, as they are practically guaranteed to arise.

 

If you are interested in learning more or are seeking out new job opportunities, the team at The Armada Group can help. Contact us to discuss your goals today and see how our services can benefit you.

 

 

Published in Hiring Managers

Promoted

 

The vast majority of workers today are not in the last position they hope to hold during their career. Often, they are looking for opportunities to advance, including a chance to land a coveted promotion.

 

At times, figuring out how to get promoted in your tech role can feel daunting, especially since every company handles their promotion processes differently. However, there are certain things you can do to increase your odds of being selected. To help you on your journey, here are four tips that can help you land a promotion.

 

  1. Don’t Be Promotion Focused

While it may seem counterintuitive, being entirely focused on earning a promotion can backfire on you. For example, if you only accept projects with a high-level of visibility and turn away work that is necessary for daily operations, you could harm your reputation.

 

Being unwilling to take part in the drudgery of the day-to-day makes it seem like you aren’t a team player, especially if your coworkers have to pick up the slack. Additionally, you may lose the respect of your peers, something else that can hurt your chances of being promoted.

 

Even though taking assignments that can showcase why you should be promoted is a smart move, you can’t ignore the basic responsibilities that come with your role. However, if you embrace these tasks along with high-profile projects, you can increase your odds of being recognized as a reliable employee who is willing to do what is necessary to help the company thrive.

 

  1. Earn the Right Kind of Recognition

Most people know that you have to be willing to work hard to get promoted. However, the precise areas in which you need to focus can seem like a mystery.

 

While every company has their own promotion criteria, certain points are almost universally reviewed. First, the leadership team will look for recent accomplishments that are beyond what is expected in your current position. Second, they will seek out information that shows you can solve complex problems. Third, they will look for evidence that you possess leadership qualities, such as the ability to train others, coordinate a project with multiple employees, resolve conflict, and communicate effectively.

 

If you can demonstrate strengths in these areas, you increase your chances of landing a promotion.

 

 

  1. Discover (and Fix) Any Perceived Gaps

At times, it can seem that even a strong performer is being passed over for a promotion. When this occurs, it’s possible that management perceives a gap in the person’s skills, experience, or capabilities.

 

If you have taken action in the areas above and still aren’t seeing results, then it’s time to talk with your manager. Schedule a meeting and let them know that you would like to be promoted and you would appreciate any feedback they could provide that would help you reach that goal.

 

This can be an intimidating conversation, particularly since it invites criticism. However, it is also an excellent learning opportunity, giving you the chance to gain insight into areas that need improving to land a promotion.

 

After your manager mentions a gap, discuss what can be done to fill it. Then, take action based on that advice, and your odds of being promoted will improve.

 

  1. Don’t Forget to Network Internally

When most people think of networking, they focus on external connections. However, by networking with leaders in your company, you increase your visibility, making it more likely that when a promotional opportunity arises that they will think of you.

 

Work to connect with employees at every level, including members of the leadership team. Provide them with value by assisting with their needs first. Then, when you need help to reach your goals, they will be more inclined to be there for you.

 

If you are interested in learning more or are seeking out new employment opportunities, the professionals at The Armada Group can help. Contact us to discuss your career goals today and see how our expertise can benefit you.

 

 

Published in Hiring Managers

Cloud Architect

 

Cloud systems are becoming increasingly important to organizations in a variety of industries, providing them with access to robust computing options that were previously inaccessible. However, it also complicates operations from a computing architecture standpoint, leading many businesses to wonder if adding a cloud architect to their team is a wise move.

 

What is a Cloud Architect?

Cloud architects are IT specialists who focus on the nuances of computing in an environment that includes cloud-based resources. This can include everything from front-end platform design and management to network structuring to content delivery.

 

As companies create more involved cloud strategies, particularly those related to multi-cloud environments, having employees that can manage the organization of assets is a must. Without the knowledge of a cloud architect, the complexity of the designs can easily become unmanageable, particularly during the transition phase.

 

Typical Skill Requirements

While each organization may have different requirements when it comes to the ideal skill set for a cloud architect, certain core competencies are commonly needed.

 

An understanding of application, integration, and network architect is often a necessity along with experience with IT security. Since cloud architects must discuss complex topics with less tech-savvy individuals, strong communication skills are a must. Having strong organizational skills should also be considered a requirement, particularly if the company is looking to begin their journey into the realm of cloud computing.

 

 

The Responsibility of Cloud Architects

Cloud architects have a range of responsibilities associated with cloud implementations. They provide guidance and support cultural change related to cloud adoption and migrating to new services. Additionally, they develop cloud architectures and strategies to make sure the resources are used effectively.

 

It is common for cloud architects to play a significant role in the vetting of third-party providers as they can leverage their knowledge to help identify service options that best suit the needs of the company. Over time, they can also provide input regarding best practices, assist in budget management, create risk mitigation policies, and perform required maintenance.

 

Cloud Architect Salaries

An employee’s salary is often a major consideration for businesses. For a skilled cloud architect, organizations should anticipate paying between $82,000 and $185,000 annually, depending on the amount of experience that is required, the physical location of the job, and the skills the person must possess.

 

On average, in the US, cloud architects earn just shy of $125,000 per year.

 

Do You Need a Cloud Architect?

Any business that is embracing the cloud as part of their standard operational paradigm could benefit from having a cloud architect on staff. This ensures you have an employee available who is familiar with the associated technologies and how they can impact other operations. Additionally, they can provide valuable input during the planning and migration phases, making the transition easier to manage.

 

If you are interested in hiring a cloud architect to join your tech team, the professionals at The Armada Group can connect you with some of the area’s leading talent. Contact us to discuss your hiring needs and see how our services can benefit your company today.

 

 

Published in Hiring Managers

Ageism

 

Bias in the workplace, whether conscious or unconscious, can be incredibly damaging. Many members of the Baby Boomer and Gen X generations fear that ageism, or discrimination based on their age, will harm their careers.

 

According to a recent survey, approximately 68 percent of Baby Boomers felt they had been discouraged from applying for jobs based on their age. Nearly 29 percent of all respondents stated they had witnessed or experienced ageism in the workplace.

 

If ageism makes it way into your tech department, not only are employees affected but the business as well. An environment that appears to hinder older staff members will miss out on excellent, skilled, and experienced workers. This occurs when current employees choose to leave as well as if the company’s reputation is impacted, leading top talent to bypass opportunities with the organization entirely.

 

Combatting ageism in your tech department doesn’t have to be difficult, but it does require some due diligence. If you aren’t sure where to begin, here are some tips for getting started.

 

Set Strong Policy Standards

Your internal employee policies can play a big role in fighting ageism in the workplace. Make sure that your organization crafts clear standards regarding discrimination, including any repercussions for participating in discriminatory activities.

 

Once set, you also need to follow through with enforcement at every level in the organization. If you don’t uphold the standards you create, many will assume they are optional, allowing ageism to proliferate in your organization.

 

 

Focus on Equality

One of the most significant steps you can take to avoid ageism in the workplace is to focus on treating all employees equally. This includes everything from the hiring decisions made in the department to the offering of training opportunities and raises.

 

Discarding strong candidates because of their age is illegal. People who are 40 and older are covered by the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and being caught in violation of these requirements come with strict penalties. Make sure managers are suitably trained on EEOC standards and emphasize that age should not be a factor in hiring decisions.

 

When it comes to your current employees, work to ensure that professional development and training opportunities are provided to any worker with the proper prerequisite skills, regardless of their age. Additionally, make sure that a person’s age does not factor into their feedback or performance reviews, particularly by punishing older workers harder for mistakes.

 

Review Your Vacancy Announcements

Before you post a vacancy announcement, review the language to make sure that it doesn’t discourage older workers from applying. Work to make your job ads inclusive by selecting language and descriptions that do not suggest an age preference.

 

Additionally, avoid using filters that target the ad to younger professionals, as this can be viewed as discriminatory. If you do want to use filters, make sure they relate to topics like the required skills or potentially the physical location of the workplace. Alternatively, you can avoid placing filters on the ad entirely, ensuring you aren’t unintentionally discriminatory during your search for a great candidate.

 

If you are interested in learning more about combatting ageism in your tech department, the professionals at The Armada Group can help. Contact us to discuss your company’s goals today and see how our expertise can benefit you.

 

 

Published in IT Infrastructure

Golang

 

In today’s job market, having IT skills can certainly help you get ahead. However, some are more valuable than others, especially in the world of development and programming.

 

Golang, which is also known as Go, has become an increasingly in-demand skill. Instead of being designed for single threaded environments, like Java or Python, Golang uses goroutines. The approach is more efficient, in regards to computing resource use, and was designed with multi-core processors in mind from the beginning.

 

Additionally, Golang is recognized for its simplicity thanks to its reduced number of keywords. That makes it an attractive option for developers, regardless of whether it is their first programming language or their ninth.

 

But, just because a skill is in-demand doesn’t guarantee a lucrative opportunity. However, professionals who focus their career on Golang could achieve substantial salaries.

 

Starting Golang Salaries

Precisely how much you can earn in your Golang career depends on the exact position you hold. However, even starting Golang developer salaries are respectable.

 

At the low-end, starting developers and engineers can usually find salaries of at least $57,000. However, those can quickly rise, especially after acquiring a few years of work experience in the field.

 

 

Average Golang Salaries

Usually, after building a bit of experience with Golang, developers and engineers can begin to see significant changes in their salaries. The average developer that focuses on Golang makes around $112,000 per year, putting them solidly over the six-figure mark. Senior developers tend to have higher salaries, with an average of more than $136,000.

 

Engineers earn just over $125,000 on average, though senior software engineers make more, coming in at approximately $146,000 annually.

 

Platform engineers do particularly well on average, coming in at over $156,000. Full stack developers with Golang also outdo traditional developers, reaching annual compensation rates above $128,000.

 

Full Salary Potential

If you have a career in Golang, it is possible to reach a salary that is significantly above the average. In some cases, annual compensation can cross $200,000 or even $250,000, though the latter isn’t as common.

 

Some of what determines salary potential is the size of the company and the precise tasks associated with the role. For example, supervisory duties might not be uncommon after you rise through the ranks a bit. Additionally, you may need to know several in-demand languages, even if Golang remains your focus.

 

Ultimately, a career in Golang can be especially lucrative, especially if you are willing to dedicate yourself to your chosen field, acquire additional experience and skills, and work to find opportunities that will help you advance.

 

If you are looking for a Golang position or any other kind of developer or software engineering position, the skilled team at The Armada Group can connect you to exciting opportunities throughout the area. Contact us to discuss your career goals with one of our recruiters today and see how our expertise can help you find your ideal position quickly and efficiently.

 

 

Published in Staffing News

Infrastructure Engineer

 

When it comes to advancing down any career path, knowledge is power. Having the right information empowers you to make smarter decisions and makes it easier to consider the big picture, something that is typically a must for infrastructure engineers.

 

However, finding reliable and helpful information isn’t always easy, especially with the sheer volume of potential resources that exist today. Whether you are a newly minted infrastructure engineer or are a seasoned professional looking to enhance their career, here are some resources that can help you during your journey.

 

Online Resources

One of the most accessible options when you want information that can assist you as an infrastructure engineer is the web. There are numerous online publications that have sections dedicated to topics that pertain to your area of specialty and can help you discover emerging trends and process that can increase your level of knowledge and efficiency.

 

BizTech Magazine is a popular site for those interested in information technology. The resource has subcategories that are particularly beneficial to infrastructure engineers.

 

The Cisco Small Business Blog is another web destination that covers a variety of IT topics. While the content caters to small businesses, infrastructure engineers at any size company may benefit from the information.

 

DoubleCloud covers details about cloud-based infrastructure as well as many other cloud-oriented topics. Since many businesses have or will soon embrace the cloud as a means of improving business operations, learning about this subsection of the larger infrastructure world is a smart move for those looking to craft strong careers.

 

 

Books

Books have been a popular resource for hundreds and hundreds of years. The benefit of choosing a book, particularly if you purchase a physical or digital copy, is you can reference the material repeatedly and even take notes along the way.

 

Written by Al Kuebler, Technical Impact: Making Your Technology Effective and Keeping It That Way, is a great book for anyone working in the larger IT field. The book covers tips on how to use technology effectively and also includes guidance on how to communicate the benefits of tech to less tech-savvy stakeholders.

 

Even though infrastructure engineering doesn’t fall into the Big Data category, Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work and Think is still a valuable read. Ultimately, Big Data changed the IT world, creating new requirements that do impact infrastructure decisions and designs. This means that infrastructure engineers can benefit from learning more about the field.

 

Ultimately, all of the resources above can be incredibly helpful to infrastructure engineers looking to take the next step in their career, no matter where they are standing on the ladder today. If you are interested in learning more or are seeking out new infrastructure engineering job opportunities, the experienced professionals at The Armada Group can help. Contact us to discuss your career goals today and see how our services can benefit you.

 

 

Published in IT Infrastructure

Tech Jobs

 

It’s no secret that tech professionals are in demand. However, certain specialties are growing at an unprecedented pace, particularly since low unemployment is common in the labor market.

 

If you are considering switching into an IT career or want to know about your current path’s potential, here are seven growing tech jobs and how much you can earn in each role.

 

  1. Help Desk / Support Desk Technician

Most large enterprises and government agencies have support desk technicians on staff to ensure that internal employees have access to help when it is required. In most cases, support desks are divided into tiers, reflecting the knowledge base needed to perform in the roles.

 

Tier 1 professionals are viewed as entry-level and can earn salaries between $32,000 and $54,000, depending on the person’s amount of experience. Tier 2 generally begins near $38,000 and can reach just shy of $64,000. At the top, Tier 3 professionals may make between $48,500 and $81,500.

 

  1. Network Administrator

Keeping internal networks operational and prepared to handle the potential load is a must for any business. Plus, planning for expansions to accommodate growth is often a necessity.

 

At the low end, network administrators usually earn around $55,000. However, after acquiring experience in the field, a salary of over $104,000 is possible.

 

  1. System Administrator

Another critical business role is the system administrator. Typically, these professionals begin their careers near $64,500. With time and experience, some are able to cross the six-figure mark, reaching a salary of around $102,500.

 

 

  1. Business Intelligence Analyst

Successful business intelligence analysts usually have skills in areas like database technology, reporting, and analytics. As companies work to leverage their data more effectively, business intelligence analyst salaries have been rising.

 

Initially, professionals in this field can earn just shy of $84,000. At the upper echelons, salaries over $175,000 may be possible.

 

  1. Database Developer

Another critical role in the data field is the database developer. These professionals manage and create enterprise databases, ensuring information is properly organized and stored while remaining accessible.

 

Usually, a database developer can begin with a salary near $97,750. After acquiring experience in the field, the best and brightest may be able to earn $175,750 annually.

 

  1. Data Security Administrator

As security continues to be a top concern for businesses large and small, data security administrators have seen their skills become increasingly valuable. They ensure that all security measures are up to date and monitor company systems while implementing sound security strategies.

Even those new to the data security administrator profession can make $100,000 a year. As their knowledge and skills grow, salari

es as high as $168,750 are certainly possible.

 

  1. Data Scientist

Data scientists collect data and analyze it in the hopes of identifying patterns that can assist with critical business decisions. Programming skills are typically a must as well as communication skills, allowing these professionals to share their findings with those who may not be as tech-savvy.

 

Most data scientists start their careers around the $100,000 mark and can earn salaries near $168,000 as they gain experience.

 

All of the tech positions above are in-demand today. If you are interested in learning more or are seeking new employment opportunities, the professionals at The Armada Group can help. Contact us to discuss your career goals today and see how our expertise can benefit you.

 

 

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