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Friday, May 31 2013

Your Job Search LinkedIn Strategy

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The power to hire

LinkedIn is quickly becoming known as the place to be seen if you're on the hunt for a new job; it's easy to post your resume, connect with others in your industry, and seek out new opportunities. Blindly filling out a profile, though, won't garner the results you're hoping for. Instead, enact a strategy for utilizing LinkedIn's tools to promote yourself successfully. With the right words and the right apps, you'll be found by the right people.

Focus on the bones of your profile

The profile section on LinkedIn provides an up-till-now unheard of benefit: the chance to put what is essentially your complete resume online, in a location where you know recruiters will see it. The first step, then, is to get that information on your profile. You never know who is looking around, but you do know that your info won't be seen if it doesn't exist.

Add enhancements to your profile

When you're confident in the main components of your page, start investigating apps that you can add to boost your content. The SlideShare Presentations app makes LinkedIn go multimedia, with the ability to upload PDFs, share presentations, and even post video. Wordpress can integrate with your LinkedIn profile, syncing your blog posts automatically, so that you reach a wider audience and don't have to think about copying posts yourself; an option to filter enables you to control what syncs. There are plenty of other useful apps, too—look around and see what best fits your profile.

Use your profile to network

Obviously, LinkedIn is best used for networking. Making connections offers you ins to new companies and people, giving you a foot in the door for your dream job or even just creating a cadre of individuals you can contact for various needs. Another app, Events, shows you what events are happening in your industry or within your network. Attend the events, engage in conversations on LinkedIn, and list your profile on your business cards: take advantage of any way you can spread the word about you and/or your business.

Stay on top of your profile

Once you've established a solid, useful LinkedIn profile, don't let it sit while you do your networking and contacting around the site. If you update your resume, do the same for your profile; keeping your information current is invaluable even when you aren't job hunting. Even information that wouldn't necessarily be included in a resume, like conferences attended or books read, can be added as it occurs, so that anyone looking has your most up-to-date details.

Link yourself in
With a readable, informative profile, eye-catching additions, community involvement, and continual evolution, you know you're getting the best out of LinkedIn. Every industry and employee is different; by making your profile your own, you project a confident presence that's much more likely to be noticed.

If you are looking for more California IT jobs, contact the staffing experts at The Armada Group today. They have the network and resources to help you develop a job search strategy, and land your next job.

Thursday, May 30 2013

Top Candidates - The Armada Group

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Sr Project Manager

  • 10 years industry experience with 8 years of Project Management skills at companies such as eBay, McAfee and Dell.
  • Lead the project from concept to completion while manage multiple projects concurrently.
  • Experience working with agile/Scrum methodology and project management principles, including scope management and planning, budget development, risk and change management, and team communication.
  • Vast expertise in online marketing extending across many industries.
  • Experience working with commercial, social medial, ecommerce, portal and multilingual websites with a proven understanding of current web technologies (web 2.0) and infrastructure, browser compatibilities & limitations, content and process management, integration, web-database platform & migration, and site implementation.
  • Managed software/technical projects in a fast-paced, primarily agile environment


Sr Software Engineer

  • 10 Years of overall software experience with around 6 years in Java and Oracle PL/SQL
  • Well versed with Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) involved in all phases of development work with Web Applications and Enterprise Applications and Deployment.
  • Expertise using J2EE design patterns like Singleton, Intercepting Filter, Service Locator, Session Façade, Factory
  • Pattern, Business Delegate, Data Access Object, and Value Object.
  • Hands on experience working with IDE’s Eclipse, WebLogic Workshop and NetBeans.
  • Experience working with Hibernate for Object relational mapping and data persistence.
  •  Excellent working experience with J2EE architecture and components like Servlets, JSP, JDBC, RMI, JNDI, Java Beans
  • Good knowledge of key Oracle performance-related features, such as Query Optimizer, Execution Plans, Hints, Indexes, Clusters, Partitioning.
  • Experience working with build tools like Ant and WebLogic Ant tasks and Maven.
  • Experience working with source code management tools such as CVS, Perforce and Sub Version.

Tuesday, May 21 2013

Nixing the “No-Show”

Written by

Making sure your interviews happen

To a hiring manager, few occurrences are as frustrating as a potential candidate skipping an interview. It means wasted prep time, lost work time during the interview period, as well as the headache of seeing a viable lead fizzle out at the last moment.

Although it’s impossible to completely eradicate no-shows, there are ways to minimize the chances of them happening. By following a few best practices, you’re much more likely to gain that face-to-face meeting with your ideal candidate.

Keep things moving swiftly

The resume review and interview process can easily become a drawn-out affair, as you weigh the benefits of each candidate, discuss their credentials with various members of the team, and communicate back and forth with those you’re interested in meeting. On the candidate’s end, this can make them lose interest, thinking they’ll never find resolution one way or another. In the meantime, another opportunity may present itself. When you keep them in the loop and aware of the process, they’ll be less likely to drop off the map.

Make the candidate feel wanted

Taking time to gauge a candidate’s genuine level of interest in your open position can help you determine early on if they’re prone to skip the interview. If they seem very enthusiastic, particularly if they present a resume and cover letter carefully tailored to your company, do your best to show them that you want them. By only interviewing a small handful of people, and letting them know they are part of a select few, you’ll assure them that you value their potential, making them more apt to follow through.

Promote your company

It should go without saying, but it’s important to consistently reinforce the excellence of your brand, and the merits of the opportunity you’re offering. A good candidate will be sought after by many companies, so the onus is on you to let them know all the positive aspects of your workplace, and to give them reasons to stick out the hiring process—including showing up to the interview.

Be flexible

As tedious as the hiring process may seem from the employer’s end, remember that potential employees have their own challenges to navigate, particularly if they’re currently working full-time. If you have the flexibility to offer weekend or evening interviews, let your candidates know. And do what you can to make the interview convenient: offer a few different times, email them a reminder, and provide multiple ways to get in touch if they need to reschedule.

Showing up is worth it

Essentially, reducing no-shows boils down to the simple concept of giving candidates what you would want if you were in their shoes: moving with a sense of urgency, keeping them in the loop, making them feel desired and informed, offering flexible arrangements, and being decisive. With those ideas in mind, you’ll ensure a positive interviewing experience for yourself and your potential hire.

If your are looking for IT staffing services in California, contact the experts at The Armada Group today. We have the experience and network to find you top IT talent.

Red flags to avoid

You have finally scheduled an interview for the position you’re hoping for, but you’re far from the finish line. The hiring manager has clearly reviewed your resume and expressed interest in your as a candidate, so a strong interview could be the last hurdle before you land your new job. While the basics of interviewing can be easily accomplished—don’t be late, dress professionally, and so on—there are more subtle actions and phrases that can turn off an IT hiring manager. Don’t fall prey to these common mistakes.

Mistake #1: Not doing your homework on the company you are interviewing with

Just because you’re the perfect fit for the position description doesn’t mean you’re right for the company, or that it’s right for you. It’s an embarrassment, to say the least, to go into an interview and be asked a question like “What 3 things did you learn about our company from our website?” and not being able to articulate an educated answer. A hiring manager can immediately tell if you haven’t done your research—if you aren’t willing to invest time to learn about the company beforehand, they’ll likely assume you won’t after being hired.

Mistake #2: Failing to listen actively

Interviews are your opportunity to present yourself and your qualifications. That doesn’t let you off the hook for listening to what the hiring manager is saying—and if you don’t breathe long enough to actively focus on what you’re being told, you’ll be on your way posthaste. Active listening goes beyond simply hearing words, and requires digesting and responding to what’s being said. Without it, you can’t connect with the hiring manager, and they’re likely to not value your input since you don’t value theirs.

Mistake #3: Being a Robot

The ability to work as a team is important, and a hiring manager will likely make sure you have that experience before taking you on. However, it’s possible to be TOO team-oriented in your interview, to your own detriment. If you consistently talk about “we”—as in “we took this approach”; “we implemented this software solution to solve X”—you run the risk of appearing to be an insignificant contributor to the initiative. It’s a fine line: don’t act like you single-handedly delivered a 50 person, 25 man-year project; at the same time, make sure the hiring manager knows your specific contributions to a successful outcome.

Mistake #4: Giving robotic answers

One of the biggest turn-offs for a hiring manager is when an interviewee fails to present herself as an individual, with specific talents and expertise. This goes beyond setting yourself apart from the “we” of your team, and involves telling detailed stories and real-world practical answers from your past. If all you offer is methodology, you’ll be perceived as no different than any other potential employee. It’s the specific facets of how you approach your work that will set you apart.

Become a shoe-in

Obviously, you want to make a lasting, positive impression at your interview. By learning as much as possible up-front about the company, actively paying attention to the conversation with the hiring manager, asserting your initiative as well as collaborative skills, and focusing on your qualities in addition to book smarts, you’ll position yourself as someone to keep an eye on—and, better yet, someone to hire.

 

If you are looking for top IT positions in California you need to be prepared for the interviewm. Let The Armada Group help you develop a job search strategy, and land you an interview with your ideal company.

The Ins and Outs of New Hire Success

Bringing on a new employee is the end of the tedious searching and interviewing process, but it is only the beginning of integrating that person into your existing team. The training process for a newly hired software engineer depends on the company and the individual’s level of experience; regardless, there are some basic guidelines—and some pitfalls to avoid—when it comes to getting the best out of your new hire.

Specificity

The most important factor in a training program for a recently onboarded software engineer is to make it specific. Break out small steps, as opposed to only focusing on a larger, more vague plan. Give your new hire specific tasks, with measurable results.

Identify the areas your new hire will need to become comfortable with: company-specific tools, platforms, and code base; the development process for new concepts; and the details of any new job environment.

Resources

While larger companies frequently have the resources and budget to hold classes, send new hires to conferences, and provide focused, long-term, one-on-one training, smaller organizations cannot afford the expense and loss of productivity that those options entail. Much of this knowledge can be acquired intuitively over time, but the purpose of the training program is to speed up the acquisition of knowledge so that you can quickly have a productive employee.

A focus on books and online training can replace expensive classes and seminars. Reading the code and code reviews, staples of most software engineer training programs, are still highly beneficial for learning the environment, though they run the risk of making the new hire feel like they’re being put under a microscope prematurely.

Timeline

The obvious pitfalls of many training programs are that they either overwhelm with new information, or proceed so slowly that your new employee is bored. Balancing new information with preexisting knowledge can be difficult; many say the best ratio is 50% prior knowledge (such as simple problem-solving, reviewing the code base, development methodologies, or working with a familiar interface) and 50% new learning (such as company-specific systems and complex architecture).

Learning from a base of knowledge is the general key to a successful training strategy. By gaining familiarity with the newest member’s background and prior experience, you’ll be able to build off that platform as you introduce new concepts and requirements. Start with small goals to keep them excited and productive, and build upon each day’s successes.

A Good Investment

A new employee has immense long-term potential to benefit a company, but the initial training stages will create a temporary drain on your resources, as current employees will have to take time to train the new hire. If you can balance this short-term loss of productivity with a customized, effective training program, you’ll see an exceptional return for your efforts, in the form of another dedicated, enthusiastic, competent employee.

 

If you are looking for software engineering talent in California, contact the staffing experts at The Armada Group today.

Careerbuilder released the results of a survey that found
40% of employers plan to hire temporary and contract workers in 2013.

Temporary workers have allowed businesses
to meet their labor demands and budget plans.

It remains critical for companies to strategize ways
to control costs and be more agile!

The largest cost for most organizations is their staff.

Utilizing contingent workers can help
employers with their hiring and staffing challenges.

Consider these questions to understand how utilizing a
contingent workforce can help you solve your hiring challenges.

1) What role can temporary workers play at my company?

2) What critical projects are in my annual plan that
require burst capacity?

3) How will temporary workers help me
meet my strategic and tactical goals?

To find out more, call to schedule a free consultation
(800) 408-2120

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