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 Post 6v3

 

In April, the European Union (EU) released a set of ethical guidelines regarding the use of artificial intelligence (AI) by government agencies and businesses. The focus is on achieving trustworthy AI – technologies that act in a lawful, ethical, and socially acceptable manner while also being technologically robust.

Specific requirements were outlined by the EU, touching on core issues and concerns, such as oversight, safety, privacy, transparency, non-discrimination, accountability, and more. While the guidelines are not considered law, they do represent a framework for organizations who wish to create a trustworthy AI.

Additionally, the guidelines aren’t technically aimed at other nations, barring companies that may do business on an international level or organizations that interact with EU citizens. However, businesses across the world – including the United States – should take notice of this effort, as they represent a unique opportunity for global business.

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Coaching employees isn’t just about giving them constructive criticism and feedback. While that is certainly helpful, you also need to provide your team with guidance and support, and that requires more than just analyzing their performance.

Many managers shy away from coaching their workers due to fear. Worrying about whether the advice you are giving is sound is often a deterrent, and the pressure associated with providing an answer quickly can be anxiety-inducing.

Luckily, having all of the answers isn’t necessary. Instead, by asking the right questions, you can help your employee work through problems. If you don’t know what to ask, here are a few kinds of questions you should always have at the ready.

Friday, May 10 2019

Google's Guide to Remote Work

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 Post 4

 

Working remotely comes with a unique set of challenges. Since at least one of the employees won’t be spending a lot of time with their coworkers in the office, portions of the team may struggle to bond with one another. This can make collaboration trickier and may harm communication, both of which can hinder the group’s overall productivity.

However, even if working remotely isn’t always easy, there are ways to improve the connection between team members. Not only can this boost morale but it can also lead to higher productivity, making the experience more enjoyable and leading to better results.

If you want to make sure remote work benefits the workplace, here are some tips Google shared to increase your odds of success.

 Post 3

 

Site reliability engineers (SREs) have actually been around for longer than DevOps specialists. The concept was created by Google in 2003 and, when the initial project was successful, other organizations added the SRE role to their ranks.

For many, the idea of becoming an SRE is intriguing. The work comes with many engaging challenges, and the positions are typically very lucrative. In Silicon Valley, the average SRE annual salary comes in around $145,000. Those in the upper tiers can even cross the $200,000 mark, which shows just how much you can earn once you have a substantial amount of experience in the field.

SREs do need a strong skill set, and typically a very diverse one. If you are wondering what skills you need to bring to the table to become an SRE in Silicon Valley, here’s what you need to know.

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When you have your dream job in sight, doing everything you can to land an interview seems like a good idea. Exaggerating your accomplishments or inflating your credentials might appear to be harmless on the surface, especially if you believe you are fully capable of handling the duties associated with the role. However, if you are thinking of lying on your resume won’t come back to haunt you, you are mistaken.

Ultimately, not being honest on your tech resume is incredibly risky. While some people do get away with it, most of them don’t. Hiring managers are adept at spotting falsehoods, particularly when it comes to the topics below.

 Post 1

 

According to a recent study, over 40 percent of all IT professionals are interviewing for a new job, and they are currently employed elsewhere. A shocking 60 percent want to quit their job. While their reasons are varied, issues with management was a commonly cited motivator. Other causes include unequal opportunities, a lack of challenging work, and no recognition for their efforts.

If your company isn’t working diligently to keep you tech employees engaged and going the extra mile to make them feel appreciated, there is a decent chance they will move on to something else. Similarly, if the employee’s manager isn’t a source of inspiration, an ally in the office, or otherwise fails to meet your IT pros expectations, don’t expect them to stay for the long-term.

Luckily, there are things you can do to entice your tech pros into staying, allowing you to reduce turnover and keep your best and brightest on board. Here’s how to get started.