Google Learns from Failure

 

While the term “postmortem” may conjure up some grisly images, that is the word Google decided to assign to its process of assessing its failures to allow them to make improvements. It involves an internal process of documenting mistakes and analyzing missteps so that the company can learn from these errors.

 

Ultimately, any organization can embrace Google’s approach, allowing them to benefit from this tried-and-true system. If you are ready to see your failures in a new light, here’s how to get started.

 

Identify the Most Significant Problems

Not every incident is as serious as others. When you want to focus on improvements that provide the most value, it’s wise to focus on issues that are genuinely important.

 

To determine which events qualify, you need to define what constitutes a major problem for your company. This may include evaluating the potential ramifications of an incident, ranging from the level of impact the organization feels to how it affects customers, as well as how severe the long-term implications are should the issue remain unresolved.

 

Document Everything

Creating a written record of the issue is a critical part of the process. It allows you to review precisely what occurred, what led to the problem, how it was mitigated, and the final resolution. Then, you can focus on defining steps that can prevent the misstep from reoccurring in the future.

 

If you want the documentation process to be successful, it’s wise to gather input from all involved parties. This ensures you get a complete picture of the incident as well as the perspectives of anyone who worked on the matter.

 

It also allows every team member to reflect on the scenario, which can potentially lead to additional insights that weren’t clear during the height of the incident. The process can be a little time-consuming, but it is worth it in the end.

 

Focus on Growth

When something goes wrong, it’s easy to play the blame game. After all, no one wants to believe they are even partially responsible for what occurred.

 

However, focusing on blame isn’t constructive. It creates an environment that is based on fear as people work to dodge any repercussions.

 

Instead of allowing blame to dominate the conversation, shift the discussion to a more constructive place by making growth the priority. This will enable you to reframe the incident as a chance to improve instead of as a setback.

 

Additionally, when you remove blame from the equation, your team will be more likely to admit their mistakes or failures, increasing the odds that you’ll be able to learn from the entire situation. Leaders also need to be honest about their errors. Otherwise, your employees won’t be as open.

 

By following the tips above, you can use Google’s approach as a positive example for addressing problems as they occur. If you would like to learn more, the professionals at The Armada Group can help. Contact us today to speak with one of our knowledgeable staff members and see how our expertise can benefit you.

 

 

Cybersecurity Salary

 

With the implementation of GDPR in May and information about leaks and breaches continuing to make headlines on a regular basis, cybersecurity is increasingly at the forefront of every company’s mind. This has created substantial opportunities for professionals working in the field, but some are more lucrative than others.

 

While your skill set and level of experience play a substantial role in determining your current or future salary, one seemingly innocuous factor also has an impact: your job title.

 

Even when the core competencies and experience level are predominately the same, the title associated with your current or next position can either help or hurt you when it comes to pay. If you are wondering why your title affects your cybersecurity salary, here’s what you need to know.

 

Job Title Nuances

Certain words within a job title can alert how you are perceived. This can lead to salary variances, impacting the amount you earn today and your worth in the eyes of a potential employer.

 

At times, these differences reflect differences in the nature of the duties. For example, an analyst role may spend more time monitoring and examining systems, identifying potential vulnerabilities, and creating plans to overcome weaknesses in the system. Testing may also be more prominent in an analyst position than some others, though this isn’t always the case.

 

Cybersecurity engineer jobs may focus more on actual system changes and physical or technical interventions. Design activities may also be more common.

 

However, in some cases, two roles with differing titles may be incredibly similar. Companies are free to label a position how they see fit, so there isn’t an inherent standard that all businesses must adhere to when deciding which title to use.

 

 

Salary Differences

While each organization controls the salary range it offers for a particular job, one survey showed that certain job titles tend to come with higher levels of compensation.

 

When the survey examined “Cybersecurity,” “Cybersecurity Analyst,” and “Cybersecurity Engineer,” as job titles, they found that the analyst positions tend to come with lower salaries than the other two in every major city they included in the analysis. Additionally, the generic “Cybersecurity” also tended to trend higher than the analyst roles.

 

However, it is possible to boost your value in the cybersecurity analyst field if you possess the CISSP certification. It can also have a positive impact on cybersecurity engineers, so don’t forgo the credential simply because you focus on the engineering aspects.

 

How to Make the Most of Your Cybersecurity Career

If you want to increase your earnings potential as a cybersecurity potential, it pays to seek out engineering roles over analyst positions. This small change can significantly improve your salary when you land a new job and throughout your career.

 

Should the option be available, consider listing your current cybersecurity position as an engineering role on your resume as well. This may make you appear more valuable in the eyes of potential employers, potentially leading to a higher salary offer. However, only do so if your employer supports that title as being appropriate to your position. Otherwise, a reference check may lead the hiring manager to see your resume as inaccurate or inflated, which could harm your chances of landing the job.

 

If you are interested in learning more or are looking to make the most of your cybersecurity career, the team at The Armada Group can help. Contact us to discuss your professional goals today and see how our services can make finding your ideal job easier than ever before.

 

 

Python Skills

 

Technology has made it easier for companies to secure talent from across the country, and even the world. Hiring remote employees can provide a lot of advantages, including locating hard to find skills and saving money on physical office space.

 

However, building trust with your remote workforce can be a challenge, largely because it requires a different management approach than you may use in the office. Managers often worry that remote employees aren’t doing their fair share and workers may not feel connected to the team, increasing feelings of isolation or fears that they are out of the loop.

 

Luckily, there are things you can do to increase trust with your remote employees. Here are three tips to get you started.

 

  1. Create a Communication Plan

Regular communication is crucial if you want to increase trust. Often, the best way to ensure that everyone is communicating often enough is to craft a schedule. For example, daily 10-minute progress meetings can help keep you up to date while allowing the employee to request additional information or guidance. Video conferences can provide everyone with face time, increasing the sense of connection.

 

Similarly, providing your entire team access to an instant messaging system can facilitate quick conversations, making project planning and information sharing simpler. Plus, many solutions allow for document sharing and multiple chat rooms, adding to overall efficiency.

 

  1. Use Outcome-Based Goals

When it comes to managing a remote workforce, outcomes are usually more important that the amount of time they spend working. If you set outcome-based goals and fully define the employee’s responsibilities, you ensure that your expectations are clear.

 

Put the goals in writing and use them to monitor the worker’s progress. Make sure the employee is completely aware of what you expect, and use your regular check-in meetings to request updates.

 

  1. Provide the Right Tools

Remote workers need a range of technologies to be effective in their role. Aside from the above-mentioned communication platform, they may need access to other software or cloud-based resources to manage their tasks. VPN services may also be necessary, particularly if your employee needs to remote into your internal network.

 

Additionally, helping them acquire items to create a comfortable workstation at their location can be beneficial, as well as technology like computers, scanners, printers, and whatever else they need to do their job.

 

Ultimately, building trust with your remote employees doesn’t have to be a challenge. By following the tips above, you can create pathways for regular communication, ensure that your expectations are clear, and that your workforce has all of the tools they need to excel in their role.

 

If you are interested in learning more about managing remote workers or are looking for skilled professionals to join your company, the team at The Armada Group can help. Contact us to discuss your unique goals with one of our knowledgeable staff members today and see how our services and expertise can benefit you.

 

 

Millenials

 

Every generation is unique, particularly when it comes to the values they hold dear and common behaviors, such as how they prefer to communicate. While certain traits typically associated with Millennials should be considered strengths, others make actually hold you back as you work to forge a career in tech.

 

If you are a Millennial tech pro and are wondering if some of the characteristics of your generation are holding your career back, here’s what you need to know.

 

Hard Work Doesn’t Guarantee Anything

Many members of the Millennial generation were raised to believe that by working hard their employer will take care of them. This leads many Millennial tech pros to put nearly all of the energy into work in hopes that it will help them get ahead. However, that doesn’t necessarily transpire.

 

When the hard work doesn’t pay off in the way they expect, many Millennials become frustrated and disappointed. However, many fail to realize that there are other mechanisms that control raises and promotions, particularly at large tech firms.

 

While being a diligent employee is certainly smart from a career perspective, it’s unwise to assume that a company will automatically reward you for your efforts beyond your current paycheck. Millennials need to, instead, learn to navigate the organization or larger industry. This can include anything from discussing what it takes to get a raise or promotion with a manager or seeking out new opportunities outside of the company.

 

 

Focusing on Happiness Can be a Mistake

Many Millennials bounce from one job to the next in hopes of finding a role that makes them happy. However, the misconception that work should be fun can hinder their careers.

 

Ultimately, as the old adage goes, if work was fun, then companies wouldn’t have to pay people to do the job. While it isn’t impossible to be happy at work, seeking out situations that provide a sense of contentment or an environment they find generally pleasant would be a better approach.

 

Typically, in a suitable job, some fun will certainly be had, but it isn’t going to be the standard. By lowering this expectation to simple contentment, it can help a position feel more satisfying. Plus, it is a much more realistic goal, which can alleviate the stress of chasing something that may be impossible to find.

 

Still Relying on the Traditional Career Ladder

Millennials were often raised by parents who could clearly map out their future thanks to traditional career ladders. This leads many of Gen Y to assume that similar paths are still available today, but that isn’t always the case.

 

Modern workplaces rely less on standard transitions from one rung to the next. Instead, employees are rewarded for accomplishments, acquiring new skills, and blazing their own trails.

 

While certain progression patterns still exist, the path between point A and point B isn’t as defined. As a Millennial tech pro, if you want to move your career forward, you have to take control of your career by seeking out new opportunities and not just waiting for them to simply appear at your feet.

 

If you are ready to take the next step forward in your career, the professionals at The Armada Group can connect you to exciting opportunities throughout the area. Contact us to discuss your goals today and see how our services can help you reach them.

 

 

Golang

 

In today’s job market, having IT skills can certainly help you get ahead. However, some are more valuable than others, especially in the world of development and programming.

 

Golang, which is also known as Go, has become an increasingly in-demand skill. Instead of being designed for single threaded environments, like Java or Python, Golang uses goroutines. The approach is more efficient, in regards to computing resource use, and was designed with multi-core processors in mind from the beginning.

 

Additionally, Golang is recognized for its simplicity thanks to its reduced number of keywords. That makes it an attractive option for developers, regardless of whether it is their first programming language or their ninth.

 

But, just because a skill is in-demand doesn’t guarantee a lucrative opportunity. However, professionals who focus their career on Golang could achieve substantial salaries.

 

Starting Golang Salaries

Precisely how much you can earn in your Golang career depends on the exact position you hold. However, even starting Golang developer salaries are respectable.

 

At the low-end, starting developers and engineers can usually find salaries of at least $57,000. However, those can quickly rise, especially after acquiring a few years of work experience in the field.

 

 

Average Golang Salaries

Usually, after building a bit of experience with Golang, developers and engineers can begin to see significant changes in their salaries. The average developer that focuses on Golang makes around $112,000 per year, putting them solidly over the six-figure mark. Senior developers tend to have higher salaries, with an average of more than $136,000.

 

Engineers earn just over $125,000 on average, though senior software engineers make more, coming in at approximately $146,000 annually.

 

Platform engineers do particularly well on average, coming in at over $156,000. Full stack developers with Golang also outdo traditional developers, reaching annual compensation rates above $128,000.

 

Full Salary Potential

If you have a career in Golang, it is possible to reach a salary that is significantly above the average. In some cases, annual compensation can cross $200,000 or even $250,000, though the latter isn’t as common.

 

Some of what determines salary potential is the size of the company and the precise tasks associated with the role. For example, supervisory duties might not be uncommon after you rise through the ranks a bit. Additionally, you may need to know several in-demand languages, even if Golang remains your focus.

 

Ultimately, a career in Golang can be especially lucrative, especially if you are willing to dedicate yourself to your chosen field, acquire additional experience and skills, and work to find opportunities that will help you advance.

 

If you are looking for a Golang position or any other kind of developer or software engineering position, the skilled team at The Armada Group can connect you to exciting opportunities throughout the area. Contact us to discuss your career goals with one of our recruiters today and see how our expertise can help you find your ideal position quickly and efficiently.

 

 

Morning Commute

 

On average, Americans spend about an hour a day commuting to and from work. In most cases, this time feels largely wasted, as it isn’t always easy to figure out what you can do while being on the road, regardless of whether or not you use public transportation.

 

Luckily, there are things commuters can do during their travel time to create a more productive morning. Here are four ways you can get started today.

 

  1. Schedule Organizing

If you take public transportation or are a passenger in a carpool, consider using your commute time to get your daily schedule organized. You can review your calendar on your smartphone, create to-do lists, or set reminders to ensure you don’t miss anything important.

 

Just a few minutes spent organizing your day can help you start work with greater ease, increasing your overall level of productivity.

 

  1. Email Review

For commuters who have their work email synced to their smartphones, the morning drive can be an excellent time to see what arrived overnight or has come in during the morning. Often, professionals are inundated with email on a daily basis, so using your commute to sort through the messages can help you identify important items before you arrive and eliminate junk mail before you reach your desk.

 

Additionally, this can be an excellent time to review any industry newsletters you subscribe to, giving you time to read through interesting and relevant information before you even start your workday.

 

 

  1. Podcasts and Audiobooks

Sometimes, simply gathering helpful information can make your day more productive. By listening to podcasts or audiobooks during your commute, drivers and passengers can benefit by increasing their knowledge of subjects relevant to them.

 

Everything from daily motivation to complex topics are covered in audio-friendly formats. They allow you to conduct research and learn valuable tidbits while you’re on the road, and many incredible podcasts can be squeezed into an average commute. And, since most cars have interfaces for playing MP3s, nearly anyone can enjoy these during their travels.

 

  1. Practice Mindfulness

Whether during your time on the road or just as you are approaching your workplace, taking a few moments to center yourself and prepare mentally for the day ahead can be incredibly helpful. Consider starting with a short five-minute meditation or listen to a song that either calms or motivates you. You can also give yourself a quick internal pep talk if you anticipate early morning challenges, increasing your confidence and helping you seize the day.

 

By using the tips above, you too can make your morning commute more productive, no matter how you travel to work. If you are interested in learning more, are seeking out new job opportunities, or are looking for a skilled candidate to fill a vacant position, the professionals at The Armada Group can help. Contact us to speak with one of our experienced team members today and see how our expertise can benefit you.